Is Your Small Biz Place a Safe & Secure Space?

Depositphotos_28228273_xsThe small business owner is challenged with creating a work environment that protects its employees as well as its assets. It faces the same security risks as the large corporations, but without the deep pockets to work with. Cyber security and physical security are often linked and a breakdown in one area makes the other area vulnerable. In fact, Parija Kavilanz from CNN Money reports that nearly one third of the cyber attacks reported in 2012 were in companies with fewer than 250 employees.

Start With the Building Access

Access to any areas beyond the front desk should be controlled by a badge or code. It can only take a moment while the receptionist is in the file room for someone to slip past into a sensitive office area. Once allowed inside, the visitor should be given a badge to be worn while they are in the building. Collect all badges when the person signs out to leave the building.

Do not give out vendor badges that they keep with them. After a year or so, you may have dozens of badges out that can allow anyone into the building. Vendors lose badges or lend them to other people, too.

Special Access Considerations

One item you may consider is a Handiramp wheelchair ramp for people challenged to get into the building through the conventional entryways. Make sure those doorways are as secure as the other doors into the building. Someone may spot the ramp and assume that doorway is an easy target.

Monitor Activity in the Building

When people are in the building, including both employees and visitors, prioritize the need to monitor their activity. Security cameras in strategic locations, such as a hallway to the computer room or into the warehouse, may be required. Cameras are often more of a deterrent than anything else. People see a camera and head the opposite direction.

Cameras can be an expensive option if they need to be monitored constantly by a service. A less expensive option is to use motion sensors that trigger the video recording to start once motion in a space is detected. Unfortunately, there is sometimes the need to protect the company and its employees from the actions of other employees. Security cameras won’t be of any help with this unless they are either monitored or recording continuously.

Establish Security Procedures

Another component of small business security is the behavioral change requirements, writes Shelley Frost in the Houston Small Business Chronicle. Technology alone doesn’t create a safe environment. The employees need to understand their responsibilities.

Create procedures describing what employees should do if they see someone without a badge wandering the hallways. Or what to do if they come upon a visitor in a sensitive workspace. Without explicit instructions, employees are likely to ignore intruders and will just continue to do their work.

Security is a Team Effort

Complete security within the workplace is a team effort between management, employees and the technology implemented. A failure in any one of these areas can cost the company time, money and perhaps its future. Keeping your physical premises secure is one step toward keeping your employees and data secure. Using a resource such as SecurityCompanies.com can connect you with many security experts who can work with you to define your company’s needs. As a small business with a finite security budget, you’ll want to prioritize your needs and implement changes as you can afford them.

Depositphotos_28228273_xsThe small business owner is challenged with creating a work environment that protects its employees as well as its assets. It faces the same security risks as the large corporations, but without the deep pockets to work with. Cyber security and physical security are often linked and a breakdown in one area makes the other area vulnerable. In fact, Parija Kavilanz from CNN Money reports that nearly one third of the cyber attacks reported in 2012 were in companies with fewer than 250 employees.

Start With the Building Access

Access to any areas beyond the front desk should be controlled by a badge or code. It can only take a moment while the receptionist is in the file room for someone to slip past into a sensitive office area. Once allowed inside, the visitor should be given a badge to be worn while they are in the building. Collect all badges when the person signs out to leave the building.

Do not give out vendor badges that they keep with them. After a year or so, you may have dozens of badges out that can allow anyone into the building. Vendors lose badges or lend them to other people, too.

Special Access Considerations

One item you may consider is a Handiramp wheelchair ramp for people challenged to get into the building through the conventional entryways. Make sure those doorways are as secure as the other doors into the building. Someone may spot the ramp and assume that doorway is an easy target.

Monitor Activity in the Building

When people are in the building, including both employees and visitors, prioritize the need to monitor their activity. Security cameras in strategic locations, such as a hallway to the computer room or into the warehouse, may be required. Cameras are often more of a deterrent than anything else. People see a camera and head the opposite direction.

Cameras can be an expensive option if they need to be monitored constantly by a service. A less expensive option is to use motion sensors that trigger the video recording to start once motion in a space is detected. Unfortunately, there is sometimes the need to protect the company and its employees from the actions of other employees. Security cameras won’t be of any help with this unless they are either monitored or recording continuously.

Establish Security Procedures

Another component of small business security is the behavioral change requirements, writes Shelley Frost in the Houston Small Business Chronicle. Technology alone doesn’t create a safe environment. The employees need to understand their responsibilities.

Create procedures describing what employees should do if they see someone without a badge wandering the hallways. Or what to do if they come upon a visitor in a sensitive workspace. Without explicit instructions, employees are likely to ignore intruders and will just continue to do their work.

Security is a Team Effort

Complete security within the workplace is a team effort between management, employees and the technology implemented. A failure in any one of these areas can cost the company time, money and perhaps its future. Keeping your physical premises secure is one step toward keeping your employees and data secure. Using a resource such as SecurityCompanies.com can connect you with many security experts who can work with you to define your company’s needs. As a small business with a finite security budget, you’ll want to prioritize your needs and implement changes as you can afford them.

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